Notable Books Challenge 2013


Although a perpetual challenge, The Notable Books Challenge asks that participants set yearly goals. This year I hope to read at least 6 books from the lists.

Visit the dedicated blog to see reviews of Notable Books or to join the challenge.

Here is what I read in 2013:

Here are some of the books I either own, or would like to read in 2013:

  • Arcadia by Lauren Groff (from 2012 NYT Most Notable AND Christian Science Monitor Best Books 2012)
  • Canada by Richard Ford (from 2012 NYT Most Notable AND Christian Science Monitor Best Books 2012)
  • The Forgetting Tree by Tatjana Soli (from 2012 NYT Most Notable)
  • In One Person by John Irving (from 2012 NYT Most Notable)
  • A Land More Kind Than Home by Wiley Cash (from 2012 NYT Most Notable)
  • The Round House by Louise Erdrich (from 2012 NYT Most Notable AND Christian Science Monitor Best Books 2012)
  • The Yellow Birds by Kevin Powers (from 2012 NYT Most Notable AND Christian Science Monitor Best Books 2012)
  • Behind the Beautiful Forevers by Katherine Boo (from 2012 NYT Most Notable)
  • Silent House by Orhan Pamuk (from 2012 NYT Most Notable)
  • Bound, by Antonya Nelson (from 2010 NYT Most Notable)
  • Foreign Bodies, by Cynthia Ozick (from 2010 NYT Most Notable)
  • How to Read the Air, by Dinaw Mengestu (from 2010 NYT Most Notable)
  • Matterhorn, by Karl Marlantes (from 2011 ALA Notable AND 2010 NYT Most Notable)
  • Sourland: Stories, by Joyce Carol Oates (from 2010 NYT Most Notable)
  • The Surrendered, by Chang-rae Lee (from 2011 ALA Notable AND 2010 NYT Most Notable)
  • The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet, by David Mitchell (from 2011 ALA Notable AND 2010 NYT Most Notable)
  • The Book Of Night Women, by Marion James (from 2010 Tournament of Books)
  • Under the Dome, by Stephen King (from 2010 Tournament of Books)
  • The Lacuna, by Barbara Kingsolver (from 2009 NYT Most Notable, AND 2010 Tournament of Books)
  • Burnt Shadows, by Kamila Shamsie (from 2010 Tournament of Books)
  • Woodsburner, by John Pipkin (from Christian Science Monitor Best Books 2009)
  • The Thing Around Your Neck, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (from Christian Science Monitor Best Books 2009)
  • The Lost City of Z, by David Grann (from 2009 NYT Most Notable, 2009 PW Best Books, 2010 ALA Notable, AND Christian Science Monitor Best Books 2009)
  • The Hakawati, by Rabih Alameddine (from 2009 ALA Notable Books)
  • American Rust, by Philipp Meyer (from 2009 NYT Most Notable)
  • A Mercy, by Toni Morrison (from 2010 ALA Notable, AND 2008 NYT Most Notable)
  • Heyday, by Kurt Anderson (from Christian Science Monitor Bests – 2007)
  • The Septembers of Shiraz, by Dalia Sofer (from 2007 Christian Science Monitor Best Books AND NYT Most Notable-2007)
  • The Likeness, by Tana French (from 2008 PW Best Books)
  • Day, by A.L. Kennedy (from 2008 PW Best Books)
  • The Boat, by Nam Le (from 2008 PW Best Books and 2008 NYT Most Notable)
  • Away, by Amy Bloom (from 2008 ALA Notable Books)
  • The Whistling Season, by Ivan Doig (from 2007 ALA Notable Books)
  • The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2007 NYT Most Notable)
  • The Art of Fielding by by Chad Harbach (2011 NYT Most Notable)
  • The Sense of An Ending by Julian Barnes (2011 NYT Most Notable)
  • A Train in Winter: An Extraordinary Story of Women, Friendship, and Resistance in Occupied France, by Caroline Moorehead (2011 NYT Most Notable)
  • Great House by Nicole Krauss (2010 NYT Most Notable)
  • Every Man Dies Alone, By Hans Fallada; translated by Michael Hoffman (2009 NYT Most Notable)
  • The Other by David Gutterson (2008 NYT Most Notable)
  • There But For The by Ali Smith (2011 PW Best Books)

 


2 thoughts on “Notable Books Challenge 2013”

  1. I’m definitely going to steal a few titles off your list, and I think the 12 books this year (from lists) seems like a good goal as well. That way, I can break it into one per month, which seems much more manageable!
    What are you reading first? I just picked up ‘Israela’ by Batya Casper (http://www.israelathebook.com), a novel set in Israel. I love it so far, it’s kind of Kite Runner-esque in the sense that it gives you a different view into Israel and makes you see the country differently.

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